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Public Area => Taxi Talk => Topic started by: Rat Catcher on August 20, 2021, 11:49:32 am

Title: If they can make it there....
Post by: Rat Catcher on August 20, 2021, 11:49:32 am
https://www.theverge.com/2021/8/17/22627387/scooter-share-nyc-bronx-bike-lanes-injuries-lime-bird-veo (https://www.theverge.com/2021/8/17/22627387/scooter-share-nyc-bronx-bike-lanes-injuries-lime-bird-veo)

SCOOTER SHARING HAS FINALLY COME TO NYC — IS THE CITY READY?

A lack of protected bike lanes and a sharp increase in cyclist injuries could hamper the Big Apple’s rollout of e-scooters

By Andrew J. Hawkins @andyjayhawk  Aug 17, 2021, 8:34am EDT

New York City is a scooter-free metropolis no longer.

On Tuesday, August 17th, three companies — Bird, Lime, and VeoRide — deposited 1,000 scooters each in the East Bronx, officially kicking off a pilot project to see how battery-powered two-wheelers fare on the mean streets of New York.

To be sure, New Yorkers have been riding personally owned electric scooters, as well as electric bikes and skateboards, in the city for years, in defiance of local rules prohibiting them. But this will be the first time that venture capital-backed scooter companies will be permitted to operate within the five boroughs. New York has been behind the curve while the rest of the world has already experienced the highs (they’re fun!) and lows (they block the sidewalk!) of scooter sharing. And now the city is about to finally catch up.

Unsurprisingly, the scooter companies are thrilled to finally have access to New York City’s 8.8 million residents — although the pilot means they’ll only initially be able to reach the 570,000 or so who live in the East Bronx. The city may authorize another 3,000 scooters next year and expand the service area. But that’s only if things go well.

“I AM, FRANKLY, JUST SO EXCITED TO BE IN NEW YORK CITY”
“I am, frankly, just so excited to be in New York City,” Lime CEO Wayne Ting told The Verge. “Even if New York’s not the first city, over time, New York will be the biggest city for micromobility because it has all the ingredients to make micromobility work.”

In the months since their selection by DOT, the scooter companies have been scrambling to get prepared for launch, hiring on-the-ground operations staff (under the provisions of the pilot, the companies are required to use salaried employees, and not independent contractors, to rebalance and charge their scooters), leasing warehouse space, working with community groups, and unboxing and assembling their vehicles.

“New York is a very different beast,” Ting said. “And so we’re going to learn as we go.”