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11
Taxi Talk / Re: Seasonal taxi story trotted out
« Last post by silverbullet on December 04, 2022, 06:18:28 pm »
Driver shortage hitting public transport - NTA
Updated / Sunday, 4 Dec 2022 14:44
NTA is focusing on retaining as many taxi drivers as possible after the pandemic
NTA is focusing on retaining as many taxi drivers as possible after the pandemic
The number of drivers returning to the taxi industry is 10% less compared to pre-pandemic levels, according to the National Transport Authority, amid calls for other modes of public transport to be extended beyond their current hours.

NTA Chief Executive Anne Graham said there are just over 3,000 inactive taxi licence holders and that as of the end of September, there were 19,145 active registered vehicles and 25,327 active registered drivers.

She said that while a large percentage of those drivers are active, not all of them are and the NTA's focus has been on retaining as many drivers as possible in the wake of the pandemic.

Speaking on RTÉ's This Week, she said: "We allowed vehicles licences to go inactive for a longer period of time, so they could become available once demand increased."

The process to become a licenced taxi driver takes between eight to ten months and industry experts believe it can put off many new drivers who are interested in joining the industry.

Ms Graham said the NTA has issued between 800 and 900 new taxi licences in 2022.

"That has shown that people are returning to the industry. There is a licencing process that is managed by An Garda Síochána and drivers have to be vetted by them. So, there is a process that needs to be gone through," she said.

Demand for taxis has increased with reports of people facing waits of up to two-and-a-half hours for a taxi after a night out.

Ms Graham said the driver shortage in the taxi industry is also impacting buses.

"We have now got ten services operating on a 24-hour basis in Dublin, and one in Cork, and we want to increase that number.

"And just as we're having driver shortages in the taxi industry, we're also having them, unfortunately, in the bus industry as well," Ms Graham said.
Taxi driver says lifestyle is putting off younger generation
Updated / Sunday, 4 Dec 2022 14:53
Philip Egan said the younger generation are not willing to work on Friday and Saturday nights
Philip Egan said the younger generation are not willing to work on Friday and Saturday nights
By Carole Coleman
.

Philip Egan has driven a taxi at night in Dublin for 40 years and said the average taxi driver is now aged in their 60s.

"My dad drove a taxi and I followed the route," he said, adding that the family tradition has not continued to the next generation. "None of my kids will drive a taxi."

As secretary of Irish Taxi Drivers Federation, Mr Egan does not believe it is the taxi regulations or the €250 licence fee that are the biggest barriers to younger entrants, but the lifestyle.

"It just looks like the younger generation are not willing to work the Friday or Saturdays," he said.

Speaking on the same programme, he said he believes the main reason for the current taxi shortage is that Dublin Bus, Luas and DART together bring huge volumes of people into the city on weekends, but do not bring them home after certain times.

"It's up to the Government and the powers-that-be to make a collective decision.

"If bars and restaurants want people out until 4 or 5 in the morning, they'll have to give them a way to get home," he said.

Dublin Bus, Luas and DART operate late schedules for nights over the Christmas period but Mr Egan said this has to be all year round.

"You need the buses running through the night, you need the Luas to run through the night. You need the DART running through the night, not just for Christmas but all year round."

According to the The National Transport Authority (NTA) there are currently over 25,300 Small Private Service Vehicles (SPSV) licenced drivers in Ireland, with 15,077 of these in Dublin.

Chief Executive of NXT Taxis Vincent Kearns said, however, that the numbers driving cabs could be much lower. He said many companies and drivers were forced out of the business during the Covid-19 pandemic, but some of these still held valid licences.



"We are probably about 30% down in our driver numbers, so there's 30% less vehicles on the road," he said.

Mr Kearns said he was concerned that the industry was failing to attract enough new young replacements.

"For that to happen there needs to be easy access to the profession," adding that a driver should be able to apply, be vetted and do the test within one or two months.

"Currently it could take eight or ten months. When people are switching jobs they won't wait around eight or ten months for a licence".

Uber, the app-based taxi company, has just launched a service in Cork and is recruiting new drivers in Cork, Limerick and Dublin.

Driver shortage hitting public transport - NTA

Uber's boss in Ireland Kieran Harte said that despite having thousands of drivers working this Christmas, meeting the demand for cabs will be a challenge.

"We’ve grown a lot over the past year. We're really hoping to grow and have more reliability on the app, but we're certainly forecasting this Christmas is going to be the most challenging one yet".

Mr Harte believes many more weekend drivers would come forward if current requirements for the type of vehicles new drivers can use were relaxed.

"It needs to be a make and model that can be modified for wheelchair accessibility. That puts a challenge on the number of vehicles that are available. It's a different commitment for new people to join the industry than it is for people who are already in it.



"A platform like Uber allows people to come on and drive maybe only Friday and Saturday evenings. If you lower those barriers we will find that a whole lot more people will come on and drive when we need them the most".

The high demand for taxis on weekend nights has meant that customers who have booked an Uber may find it has been cancelled without warning - something Mr Harte said is unavoidable.

"One of the challenges is drivers are their own independent operations and for many good reason might see someone flag them down and prefer to start the fare there rather than five minutes later."

Mr Kearns said that on any given night one in three customers will be told there is no car available.

The NTA recently ran a 10-week recruitment drive, which it said had already shown positive results.

But for real change, Mr Kearns - who is a former industry representative - said there needs to be a clear roadmap for the industry.

"We need a six-month plan for the immediate short-term fixes. Then we need a three to five-year plan so that people who are willing to come in and invest in a new electric vehicle know there is stability, and they can make a living."

Like most taxi drivers Philip Egan has adapted to the booking apps. Many of his fares come through the Free Now and Bolt apps.

"At 60, I’m not great at the technology. For every job Free Now or Bolt gives me, they get 15%."

He said 90% of passengers pay by card in advance of being picked up.

"When the job is done you press a button and you get paid every Tuesday."



Mr Egan said most night-time passengers are great, but as he gets older he is becoming "more wary."

"You do hear some horror stories," he said.

His father retired two years ago, aged 88.

"He was over 50 years driving a taxi. I don’t think I’ll be driving at 88!"
12
Taxi Talk / Seasonal taxi story trotted out
« Last post by silverbullet on December 04, 2022, 06:11:55 pm »
Driver shortage hitting public transport - NTA
Updated / Sunday, 4 Dec 2022 14:44
NTA is focusing on retaining as many taxi drivers as possible after the pandemic
NTA is focusing on retaining as many taxi drivers as possible after the pandemic
The number of drivers returning to the taxi industry is 10% less compared to pre-pandemic levels, according to the National Transport Authority, amid calls for other modes of public transport to be extended beyond their current hours.

NTA Chief Executive Anne Graham said there are just over 3,000 inactive taxi licence holders and that as of the end of September, there were 19,145 active registered vehicles and 25,327 active registered drivers.

She said that while a large percentage of those drivers are active, not all of them are and the NTA's focus has been on retaining as many drivers as possible in the wake of the pandemic.

Speaking on RTÉ's This Week, she said: "We allowed vehicles licences to go inactive for a longer period of time, so they could become available once demand increased."

The process to become a licenced taxi driver takes between eight to ten months and industry experts believe it can put off many new drivers who are interested in joining the industry.

Ms Graham said the NTA has issued between 800 and 900 new taxi licences in 2022.

"That has shown that people are returning to the industry. There is a licencing process that is managed by An Garda Síochána and drivers have to be vetted by them. So, there is a process that needs to be gone through," she said.

Demand for taxis has increased with reports of people facing waits of up to two-and-a-half hours for a taxi after a night out.

Ms Graham said the driver shortage in the taxi industry is also impacting buses.

"We have now got ten services operating on a 24-hour basis in Dublin, and one in Cork, and we want to increase that number.

"And just as we're having driver shortages in the taxi industry, we're also having them, unfortunately, in the bus industry as well," Ms Graham said.
13
Taxi Talk / Re: Stuff What Dublin Taxidrivers should know .
« Last post by silverbullet on December 04, 2022, 05:56:05 pm »
The Yellow Eastern Health Board/HSE building on St John's Road West/ Dr Steevens Hospital was to have been built in India and the actual building designed for the site ended up being built IN India. Thus explaining the rather odd architecture, because someone in the Government got the blueprints mixed up. It's suggested it mimics The Royal Hospital in Kilmainham.
https://www.archiseek.com/2010/1717-dr-steevans-hospital-dublin/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr_Steevens%27_Hospital
https://www.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/doi/10.3828/eci.2022.3
14
Taxi Talk / Re: Crumlin's Cretin
« Last post by markmiwurdz on December 04, 2022, 05:55:41 pm »
McKnacker will go down in flames,nothing surer.
15
Taxi Talk / Re: FN Sept/Oct Bobo still not paid.
« Last post by markmiwurdz on December 04, 2022, 05:51:18 pm »
Here we go again.... rofl
16
Taxi Talk / Re: How do you upload a bank statement to Uber.
« Last post by taxi1990 on December 04, 2022, 05:17:55 pm »
Yeah 1990 come up and see how you get on.If it was easy to move at around and get flagged down we'd do it ourselves.You only hear about the few hours at the weekend that passengers can't get out of town.The rest of the week there's not the same demand.All you hear are the whinging passengers who expect empty taxis to pass them every 30 seconds.

By the way most of my rank work now ask to pay by card so there is no incentive to park up versus taking an app job.Some lads on here thought we'd take the work back off the apps when card payments became mandatory but all I got was even less cash work off the street.

It's not unusual to park on a rank and have a passenger using apps right in front of you.They don't give a shit.They just want a taxi on their app.


its usually day time in Dublin when I need taxis. I always just hail one when I can find one or go to a rank.

would the majority of drivers turn off the apps when its busy weekend nights?
17
Taxi Talk / Re: Stuff What Dublin Taxidrivers should know .
« Last post by silverbullet on December 04, 2022, 05:00:57 pm »
Viking splash tours are advertising for drivers on the radio too if Ya have an interest in that stuff.Competitive salary plus tips.

Seen one yesterday full to the brim wit tourists or indigenous local irish who risk ther kids lives in 80 yer old  rust bucket shite heaps ...

18
Taxi Talk / Re: Why only pay between blanch and Clondalkin ?
« Last post by silverbullet on December 04, 2022, 04:53:16 pm »
Posted this before .If you look before and after every Exit there are overhead gantries to hold the cameras to record you getting and off the 50 !
What this does is deter people from using the M50 Dublin ring road and clogging up inner roads instead.
19
Taxi Talk / Re: Why only pay between blanch and Clondalkin ?
« Last post by John m on December 04, 2022, 04:27:48 pm »
Posted this before .If you look before and after every Exit there are overhead gantries to hold the cameras to record you getting and off the 50 !
20
Taxi Talk / Why only pay between blanch and Clondalkin ?
« Last post by John m on December 04, 2022, 04:26:29 pm »
Transport Infrastructure Ireland has been tasked with exploring options around the future of road tolling, which could include a multi-point tolling system.

Such a system would see cars tolled based on the length of a road used, and would apply to motorways across the country, including the M50 in Dublin.

As reported by The Business Post, the work has been called "Project Bruce" or "Better Road User Charging Evaluation".

The options are being examined to help with the country meet climate objectives and improve revenue generation as the road network returns to public ownership.

These efforts are understood to be at an early stage, with most Public Private Partnership agreements running until 2030 and one due to remain in place until 2052.

It comes a number of days after the Cabinet agreed to defer an increase in toll charges until July at a cost to the taxpayer of €12.5 million.
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