Author Topic: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .  (Read 1540 times)

Offline john m

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Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« on: July 26, 2020, 03:51:31 am »
Talking to people yesterday and the sense of Entitlement and absolute ignorance is frightening ."Im not wearing a fucking mask ,no social distancing ,no Covid app and  not even washing their hands .Covid 19 is over they are finished observing any sort of protocol .I am thinking of calling them selfish fucktards as their behaviour will guarentee another outbreak .Every Scientist ,fortune teller card reader in the world is forecasting the Jesus Corona or the Second comming of the Virus .

  But then I think I understand the behaviour ,you just need to join the dots with other issues .They were in lockdown given SOME freedom and they run amok Just like every other grant of freedom .Homosexuality was made legal and then it was full steam ahead to Same sex marrage which was a natural progression but then the extreamists got involved and Trans and sex changes for Children became the next step.Green Politics first it was Acid rain now its total lifestyle change going back to the dark ages of bicycle transport .Getting rid of Concord cutting down on automated transport living in futuristic high rise new tenement buildings in City centers just like people did in 1900 all regressive steps .In America Civil rights campaigners expressing their disgust at how certain people are treated have now instead of improving their situation have just made it bad for everybody by rioting ,denying the past they object to by pulling down statues that advertise that past .It seems the more freedom you give people the more freedom they want to take away from others .Its human nature I suppose first you get a job doing the paper round or working as a lounge boy but you always want more .If this fever comes back I doubt the Government will be able to enforce a second lock down as we feel we are free to kill ourselves if we want to but its other people that we will kill .Drove down Georges Street last night no sign of any Social awareness of any Social distancing .Scarey watching stupidity in action as people enjoy the freedom at the expense of other peoples freedom or lives .Now according to the government opening the schools is the most important thing to get the country back on track .

  The pubs are still not open but they want to re open the schools put hundreds of thousands of kids and teachers in small rooms to spread all sorts of infections but then I realised Kids wont get the Fever because they will be getting free milk and sambos along with their lessons and we all know food stops the spread of the dizzzzzeeeeze .Frightening how quick people forgot that there are still rules to keep everybody safe but those rules dont seem to matter at the weekends .

Offline john m

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2020, 04:43:35 am »
Jack Charltons funeral about 100 people on the Walkinstown Roundabout no social distancing all singing their heads off ,every newspaper that reported it said how great Jack was not one mention of the lack of social distancing .

Offline Dr. Martin Gooter Bling

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2020, 05:15:53 am »
It's all a loada bollocks.

Offline john m

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2020, 09:24:04 am »
It's all a loada bollocks.

Your only saying that with your mouth .

Offline Octavia1

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2020, 10:10:08 am »
It's all a loada bollocks.


1700 people died who wer on ther way out already.....the chinese flu just freed up beds in nursin homes .....
The economic fallout from this thing is going to kill more blokes from suicide than 1700 ...its going ruin more
Marriages and cause divorce and the kids will be even more fuked up in the head with the confusion and disconnect of modern life ....theyll decend inta ther playstation shooting games an try every drug and drink given to them to escape the sociopathic world they live in  an the absence of love an affection an consequences of broken homes will drive them even furtherinto despair an sociopathic brain cloned cnuts   .

We should go the swedish route an ignore the cnutin ting an let motherr nature an the grim reaper  take the sick weak an old ....to save the rest of us
« Last Edit: July 26, 2020, 10:15:17 am by Octavia1 »

Offline Theoneandonly

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2020, 10:10:29 am »
Download the app https://covidtracker.gov.ie/?gclid=CjwKCAjw0_T4BRBlEiwAwoEiAXp1-JiOV6HdgGzwgXcwEUyaN2CDG_3ns15hWM6_zHRoJmIZmcVSnBoCHfcQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
Wear a Mask
Wash your hands
Social distance
Everyone do your little bit, it's really not that much to ask ... is it?

Offline dalymount

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2020, 10:17:54 am »
It's all a loada bollocks.


1700 people died who wer on ther way out already.....the chinese flu just freed up beds in nursin homes .....
The economic fallout from this thing is going to kill more blokes from suicide than 1700 ...its going ruin more
Marriages and cause divorce and the kids will be even more fuked up in the head with the confusion and disconnect of modern life ....theyll decend inta ther playstation shooting games an try every drug and drink given to them to escape the sociopathic world they live in  an the absence of love an affection an consequences of broken homes will drive them even furtherinto despair an sociopathic brain cloned cnuts   .

We should go the swedish route an ignore the cnutin ting an let motherr nature an the grim reaper  take the sick weak an old ....to save the rest of us
thats all very well ocki,but this think is not only taking the sick weak and old,its now taking fit young men and women as well

Offline watty

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2020, 10:30:32 am »
It's not as simple as you die or you don't.  Have a read of this: But It’s Only 1% Fatal!” Person Shuts Down Covidiots By Giving Some Gruesome Numbers Of Possible Victims



That (American) info is a week old and I don't know how valid it is but it gives you some idea of how bad it can affect society as a whole.  So don't be a selfish c*nt!

Offline Octavia1

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2020, 10:36:32 am »
It's all a loada bollocks.


1700 people died who wer on ther way out already.....the chinese flu just freed up beds in nursin homes .....
The economic fallout from this thing is going to kill more blokes from suicide than 1700 ...its going ruin more
Marriages and cause divorce and the kids will be even more fuked up in the head with the confusion and disconnect of modern life ....theyll decend inta ther playstation shooting games an try every drug and drink given to them to escape the sociopathic world they live in  an the absence of love an affection an consequences of broken homes will drive them even furtherinto despair an sociopathic brain cloned cnuts   .

We should go the swedish route an ignore the cnutin ting an let motherr nature an the grim reaper  take the sick weak an old ....to save the rest of us
thats all very well ocki,but this think is not only taking the sick weak and old,its now taking fit young men and women as well

How many daily? ....10 ?15:? .......I'm saying more peoples lives be lost and ruined from the fallout .....I remember a woman on radio from  pieta house or trinity or some kip sayin she estimated 4-5000 suicides in ireland due to the global financial crisis an that the government figures didnt reflect the true figures an it was swept under the carpets ......an the economic collapse of this country , which hasnt even revealed itself yet cause the country is living on savings...is going be worser ten fold to the gfc ......

 

Offline john m

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2020, 10:55:32 am »
Occi I agree with you more people will die by their own hand than will die from the fever in Ireland and a big contributor to that will be a second wave a lot of people did what they were asked played by the rules and when the Jesus Corona arrives they will be looking for others to blame .Leo Mick and Eamo will say we told you to distance wash your hands wear a bally and you didnt so its all your own fault .Then the accusations will fly with everybody blaming everybody else and forgetting about blaming the china man .The next year is going to be so fucking dangerous for the World Trump wins or loses dosent really matter America is at war with itself .Brexit and the British Government will order British troops on to the streets of Britain to shoot British people .Kids are resilient they will adapt but old cunts like us who will see all our value systems destroyed and a war of the fittest will either have to fight back or roll over .Time to get a GUN

Offline john m

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2020, 11:10:24 am »
Here Occi give this a read and see what has changed while we have been examining our phlegm or snot ....

There is an assumption that an ever-higher number of apartments and houses per hectare, tellingly referred to as “units”, is a good thing. Driven by considered social strategies, that may be true. Driven by random applications by developers maximising profit, it may not.
Densification of housing in itself is no bad thing. Some of our most desirable inner suburbs have high densities. But leaving such an important issue to the vagaries of the market maximising its profit is not the most sustainable or equitable method of achieving appropriate densities.
The combination of developer-led design, ministerial directives and the short-circuiting of the decision-making process to An Bord Pleanála leads to excessive risk of fundamentally uncertain outcomes. The most likely one, in my opinion, is failure. I fear that we will end up with random pustules on the face of our cities, towns and villages.
For areas outside the core of the city, the proposed densities of recent applications of 180-400 units per hectare are patently destructive and basically wrong
Dublin city could work well with proposed densities similar to Paris (100-225 homes per hectare) or Copenhagen (170-200); the inner suburbs perhaps at densities close to Amsterdam (100-150). The outer suburbs could perhaps be at densities similar to the outer suburbs of Basel at about 50 homes per hectare.
But for Dublin, densities as high as Manhattan (232 homes per hectare), Singapore (240) and Beijing (260) are not appropriate for anything other than the centre of the city, where successful developments that have been built range from 100-250 homes per hectare.
For areas outside the core of the city, which currently have densities of about 25 homes per hectare, the proposed densities of recent applications of 180-400 units per hectare are patently destructive and basically wrong.
A decade ago, the Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland produced a second book on sustainable housing, Building Better Communities, which illustrates best practice in housing. These have been very successful and have stood the test of time.
The densities cited were in the order of 130-230 homes per hectare in our inner cities; 70-100 in our inner suburbs; and 10-60 in our outer suburbs. Those sorts of levels of density have created sustainable communities in a human-built environment. The densities being proposed under the new Strategic Housing Development legislation and ministerial directives will not.
Developer-led
Do we really want our cities, towns and villages designed by developer-led planning and determined by unelected officials? That is what is happening now.
Before we inflict the most radical and destructive change to the character of the places we live, driven by a misplaced belief in market forces, without an overall framework or vision of what our communities will look like and how they will survive, someone must shout “Stop”.
We are about to unleash a seismographic change that, I believe, will destroy the spatial, visual and communal qualities of the places we live. We are about to build the wrong homes in the wrong places at the wrong price, at an enormous future cost.
Whether Covid-19 and future pandemics will have an impact on the desirable density of housing – both inside and outside – has yet to be seen
The system of democratically based area planning through development plans has been subverted. Ministerial directives, under section 28 of the Planning Acts, have over-ruled plans prepared by local authorities, and approved by elected representatives after public consultation.
These have downgraded space standards to facilitate “build-to-rent” schemes and allowed for heights far in excess of anything permitted by local development plans.
The Strategic Housing Development Regulations of 2017 are a temporary measure to speed up the planning process. For large housing developments, planning decisions are no longer made by the local authority, but are made directly by An Bord Pleanála, and there is no right of appeal against a decision by the board.
These two factors have combined to generate an extraordinary scatter-gun approach to how Ireland’s cities and suburbs are going to develop, without reference to any overall plan for these areas. There is no longer any over-riding vision of how we want our cities, towns, suburbs and villages to look and function.
Collective failure
The State’s encouragement of this process is driven by a collective failure to make sufficient homes available to our citizens at an affordable cost. We have conflated the shortage of housing with creating a system that facilitates the needs of developers. This will not answer the needs of our society. Expecting private developers to provide a public service is doomed to failure.
What we are witnessing is unco-ordinated development, designed at densities that are far in excess of anything that has ever been built in our country, including the tenements of the late 19th century. Officials who are not accountable to the democratic process, unlike the local planning authorities, will decide this unco-ordinated development.
It is not the fault of An Bord Pleanála that it has neither the resources nor the mandate to demand area plans to put these individual Strategic Housing Development applications into a physical, social and community context. I also fear an unquestioning assumption within the board that the higher the density is, the better.
Whether Covid-19 and future pandemics will have an impact on the desirable density of housing – both inside and outside – has yet to be seen. Having already dealt with the health impacts of overcrowding in the last century (at lower densities than most of the current applications), do we really want to force people into ever-closer proximity?
Robin Mandal is an architect and former president of the Royal Institute of Architects in Ireland

Offline Octavia1

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2020, 11:14:17 am »
Here Occi give this a read and see what has changed while we have been examining our phlegm or snot ....

There is an assumption that an ever-higher number of apartments and houses per hectare, tellingly referred to as “units”, is a good thing. Driven by considered social strategies, that may be true. Driven by random applications by developers maximising profit, it may not.
Densification of housing in itself is no bad thing. Some of our most desirable inner suburbs have high densities. But leaving such an important issue to the vagaries of the market maximising its profit is not the most sustainable or equitable method of achieving appropriate densities.
The combination of developer-led design, ministerial directives and the short-circuiting of the decision-making process to An Bord Pleanála leads to excessive risk of fundamentally uncertain outcomes. The most likely one, in my opinion, is failure. I fear that we will end up with random pustules on the face of our cities, towns and villages.
For areas outside the core of the city, the proposed densities of recent applications of 180-400 units per hectare are patently destructive and basically wrong
Dublin city could work well with proposed densities similar to Paris (100-225 homes per hectare) or Copenhagen (170-200); the inner suburbs perhaps at densities close to Amsterdam (100-150). The outer suburbs could perhaps be at densities similar to the outer suburbs of Basel at about 50 homes per hectare.
But for Dublin, densities as high as Manhattan (232 homes per hectare), Singapore (240) and Beijing (260) are not appropriate for anything other than the centre of the city, where successful developments that have been built range from 100-250 homes per hectare.
For areas outside the core of the city, which currently have densities of about 25 homes per hectare, the proposed densities of recent applications of 180-400 units per hectare are patently destructive and basically wrong.
A decade ago, the Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland produced a second book on sustainable housing, Building Better Communities, which illustrates best practice in housing. These have been very successful and have stood the test of time.
The densities cited were in the order of 130-230 homes per hectare in our inner cities; 70-100 in our inner suburbs; and 10-60 in our outer suburbs. Those sorts of levels of density have created sustainable communities in a human-built environment. The densities being proposed under the new Strategic Housing Development legislation and ministerial directives will not.
Developer-led
Do we really want our cities, towns and villages designed by developer-led planning and determined by unelected officials? That is what is happening now.
Before we inflict the most radical and destructive change to the character of the places we live, driven by a misplaced belief in market forces, without an overall framework or vision of what our communities will look like and how they will survive, someone must shout “Stop”.
We are about to unleash a seismographic change that, I believe, will destroy the spatial, visual and communal qualities of the places we live. We are about to build the wrong homes in the wrong places at the wrong price, at an enormous future cost.
Whether Covid-19 and future pandemics will have an impact on the desirable density of housing – both inside and outside – has yet to be seen
The system of democratically based area planning through development plans has been subverted. Ministerial directives, under section 28 of the Planning Acts, have over-ruled plans prepared by local authorities, and approved by elected representatives after public consultation.
These have downgraded space standards to facilitate “build-to-rent” schemes and allowed for heights far in excess of anything permitted by local development plans.
The Strategic Housing Development Regulations of 2017 are a temporary measure to speed up the planning process. For large housing developments, planning decisions are no longer made by the local authority, but are made directly by An Bord Pleanála, and there is no right of appeal against a decision by the board.
These two factors have combined to generate an extraordinary scatter-gun approach to how Ireland’s cities and suburbs are going to develop, without reference to any overall plan for these areas. There is no longer any over-riding vision of how we want our cities, towns, suburbs and villages to look and function.
Collective failure
The State’s encouragement of this process is driven by a collective failure to make sufficient homes available to our citizens at an affordable cost. We have conflated the shortage of housing with creating a system that facilitates the needs of developers. This will not answer the needs of our society. Expecting private developers to provide a public service is doomed to failure.
What we are witnessing is unco-ordinated development, designed at densities that are far in excess of anything that has ever been built in our country, including the tenements of the late 19th century. Officials who are not accountable to the democratic process, unlike the local planning authorities, will decide this unco-ordinated development.
It is not the fault of An Bord Pleanála that it has neither the resources nor the mandate to demand area plans to put these individual Strategic Housing Development applications into a physical, social and community context. I also fear an unquestioning assumption within the board that the higher the density is, the better.
Whether Covid-19 and future pandemics will have an impact on the desirable density of housing – both inside and outside – has yet to be seen. Having already dealt with the health impacts of overcrowding in the last century (at lower densities than most of the current applications), do we really want to force people into ever-closer proximity?
Robin Mandal is an architect and former president of the Royal Institute of Architects in Ireland
Have ya a fukin link for that  ::)

Offline Octavia1

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #12 on: July 26, 2020, 11:15:01 am »
Fuk sakes yull have ratt on to you again  :-X

Offline john m

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #13 on: July 26, 2020, 11:20:42 am »
The Strategic Housing Development Regulations of 2017 are a temporary measure to speed up the planning process. For large housing developments, planning decisions are no longer made by the local authority, but are made directly by An Bord Pleanála, and there is no right of appeal against a decision by the board.


  Dont take your eye off the ball Occi .When Brona and Ashling decide to bring up their baby in Utopian Tower somewhere in the City close to the tram and Bicycle rack and share the floor with Big Dommos young ones young ones younge one and her seven youngones .The penny will drop they are no better off than their Grannys Granny was in Number 54 Henrietta Street .I think I said this before people born between 1950 and 1980 were the luckiest generation ever born .

Offline Octavia1

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Re: Why Ireland will go back into lockdown .
« Reply #14 on: July 26, 2020, 11:20:51 am »
https://news.sky.com/story/why-online-influencers-and-creatives-need-a-union-12036302
Read this Johnny while I'm readin that .....
I see  "  the influencers "  on fakebook want to join a union .....
The world is gone fukin mad ....
Wat a sinister word .....influencers.......years ago we called them meglamaniacal egotistical self absorbed sociopathic cunts livin in cookoo land .....



 


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